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Ghost Towns

Goldfield – Arizona Ghost Town

Goldfield Arizona Ghost Town

Back in the 1890′s Goldfield boasted 3 saloons, a boarding house, general store, blacksmith shop, brewery, meat market and a school house. Just when it looked like the town would outgrow Mesa, AZ, the vein faulted, the grade of ore dropped and the town died a slow painful death, becoming an Arizona ghost town.

Goldfield Arizona Ghost Town

Collin Hakes, Riley Morse and Orlando and Orin Merrill were the first to discover gold in the Goldfield area of the Superstition Mountains. Soon thereafter, prospectors came to the area in search of gold. In 1893, the mining town, which became known as Goldfield, was founded next to the Superstition Mountain in what was then the Arizona Territory. The town, in its heyday, reached a population of about 4000 residents. It had a hotel, general store, post office, church and school. When the mine vein faulted in 1897, the grade of ore dropped leaving the miners without a job. The town began to suffer since its economy depended heavily on the earnings of the miners who moved out. It was not long before the rest of the towns residents relocated to other areas leaving Goldfield a ghost town.

In 1910, several mines were opened nearby with the installation of a mill and cyanide plant. A small community called Youngberg evolved around the ghost town. The town was named after George U. Young, secretary of Arizona and acting governor at the time. Young was interested in the development of the mining industry of the area. He became President and general manager of the Madizelle Mining Company and Young Mines Company, Ltd. However, the mines faulted again and by 1926, the town was once again deserted.

Now, visitors can tour the historic Mammoth Gold Mine and visit the Goldfield Museum. Then one can take a ride on Arizona’s only narrow gauge train and witness an old west gun fight performed by the famous Goldfield Gunfighters.

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